More than 50 countries, including Australia, New Zealand, Canada and New Zealand have passed laws imposing new sanctions on companies and individuals that help to facilitate the trade in counterfeit goods, as part of an effort to curb counterfeit and pirated goods that are increasingly becoming a significant part of global commerce.

The new laws, which were introduced by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), aim to stop the export of counterfeit goods to countries such as China, Iran, Russia, Venezuela and Thailand, where counterfeit goods have been linked to widespread human rights abuses.

“The international community is doing everything we can to fight this scourge, and to ensure that counterfeiting products are never allowed to enter the global marketplace,” UNODC Director General Juan Luis Gonzalez said in a statement on Thursday.

“This is a complex and multi-layered issue and the global community will not tolerate any efforts to export the most harmful products.”

Mr Gonzalez said that despite the efforts to restrict the export trade, counterfeiters continue to be able to get their hands on high-quality counterfeit goods.

“There is a continuing global trade in goods with very little oversight, which means that many companies and people have a direct and direct role in creating this problem,” he said.

“We have to find a way to work together to find solutions that make our communities safer, and the counterfeiters pay.”‘

I have no idea what’s going on’The United States, which has long been the top destination for counterfeiters to send goods into the United States from China, has already cracked down on the importation of counterfeiters goods, according to UNODD data.

The United Kingdom has also recently imposed sanctions on individuals and companies that assist and facilitate the export and sale of counterfeit products.

But, despite the sanctions, experts are concerned that some counterfeiters may continue to sell goods at prices that are higher than what the law requires.

“I have absolutely no idea how this business is going to operate and how much it will actually be able sell,” Australian National University economist and former UNODc official Kevin Fenton said.

Australia’s new anti-counterfeiting legislation was introduced on January 8, the same day that China imposed a new round of new restrictions on the trade.

Mr Fenton is one of the country’s leading experts on counterfeiters.

He said there was a real possibility that counterfeiters will continue to operate on a very low-cost basis, with prices that undercut the value of legitimate products.

“It is not clear that it is possible to stop this kind of thing and not allow a real threat of this kind to emerge,” he told the ABC.

Topics:fraud-and-corporate-crime,counterfeit-trading,global-trade,government-and ofcc,international-aid-and,human-rights,business-economics-and.business-news,government,law-crime-and_prosecution,industry,trade,china,asia,south-africa,australia,united-statesFirst posted February 19, 2020 19:26:51Contact Anna Marmor at [email protected]

I don’t think it is going away, so this is a real risk to our economic well-being.”

Topics:fraud-and-corporate-crime,counterfeit-trading,global-trade,government-and ofcc,international-aid-and,human-rights,business-economics-and.business-news,government,law-crime-and_prosecution,industry,trade,china,asia,south-africa,australia,united-statesFirst posted February 19, 2020 19:26:51Contact Anna Marmor at [email protected]

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